The Brazilian government pays compensation for a maternal death taken up by CEDAW – a decision that has global implications

14/09/2012 Comments Off on The Brazilian government pays compensation for a maternal death taken up by CEDAW – a decision that has global implications

Lisa Hallgarten, RHM

The Brazilian government has agreed to pay compensation for the death of a pregnant woman in 2002. The decision could have implications for governments around the world where women are dying from preventable deaths in pregnancy, childbirth and abortion. The Brazilian government’s move follows landmark decisions by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in Brazil and Peru – reported in Reproductive Health Matters. CEDAW confirmed that all states have a human rights obligation to: guarantee good quality maternal health care; guarantee access to abortion when a woman’s mental or physical health is threatened by continuation of her pregnancy; and decriminalise abortion when the pregnancy results from rape or abuse.

The case of of Alyne da Silva Pimentel v. Brazil was taken up by CEDAW in 2011. Alyne died following a stillbirth towards the end of her second trimester of pregnancy as a result of misdiagnosis, inadequate treatment in her local health centre, failure of the centre to refer her for timely emergency obstetric care and inadequate care when she was finally referred. CEDAW found that she was a victim of discrimination because she was a woman, poor and of African descent. Following the CEDAW Committee’s recommendations, the Brazilian government has agreed to pay compensation for Alyne’s death in childbirth, and is to set up an inter-ministerial enquiry into where responsibility lies for the chain of events that result in a maternal death. It also plans to organise a seminar on the issue for lawyers and health professionals.

In the case of L.C. v. Peru, a young girl had been repeatedly raped by different men in her neighbourhood over a period of four years. At the age of 13 she learned that she was pregnant and made a suicide attempt which failed, but left her at risk of paralysis and in urgent need of spinal surgery. She was refused the surgery she needed because she was pregnant, and was also refused an abortion. Three months later she miscarried and doctors agreed to perform the surgery. Unfortunately the delay meant the intervention was unsuccessful and L.C. is now quadriplegic. Peruvian law already permits abortion in cases where a woman’s health or life is at risk. CEDAW ruled that access to abortion in these cases should be guaranteed.

CEDAW’s findings come in the context of legal and civil actions around the world aimed at making governments accountable for women’s health and lives in pregnancy, childbirth and abortion. We hope that the announcement from Brazil that it will act on CEDAW’s recommendations may encourage Peru to do so too, and will  help to reinforce the fundamental principle that women’s rights are human rights.

Other cases highlighted in RHM

Alyne’s case and the negligent, callous and discriminatory treatment she experienced, has echoes in stories we have published from all over the world including the testimony of a doctor in a sub-Saharan African country on this blog. Papers in May’s issue of Reproductive Health Matters demonstrate that failure to provide good quality, equitable and accessible maternal health care is widespread. Increasingly however, lawyers, families and health professionals have had some success in holding their governments and health services to account.

In India an investigation into maternal deaths in Madhya Pradesh documented lack of accountability, and discrimination against poor women, particularly tribal women. However, the authors report that since presenting the report some of their recommendations have been taken up. In another article from India authors explore the successful legal case made for compensation and accountability for the death of Shanti Dev in Haryana State.

Another article reports on opportunities for progress that could be learned from the success of HIV activism in sub-Saharan Africa where health professionals and civil society activists have formed alliances to demand constitutional rights to health care for people living with HIV. A recent attempt by health activists in Uganda to use the courts to establish the constitutional rights of women to quality maternal health care failed, but the NGOs involved have promised to appeal…watch this space.

Read the full editorial of RHM’s recent issue Maternal mortality or women’s health: time for action

Making change happen is in the air

13/07/2012 Comments Off on Making change happen is in the air

Marge Berer

Editor, Reproductive Health Matters

Below, are excerpts from my editorial in RHM 20(39) May 2012. This issue is about reducing maternal mortality, but the more I reflected on it the more I realised it had implications for this week’s summit on family planning.

Making change happen is in the air, from the UN Secretary-General down to the most remote village… Yet, in certain ways, the world is moving backwards when it comes to dealing with women and pregnancy. Simone Diniz calls it a return to “materno-infantilism” – treating pregnant women like children who need looking after… Today, in much of the literature, all pregnant women are called “mothers” whether they’ve ever had a baby or not. Yet pregnancy has more than one outcome and is not only about women who “deliver”. It’s also about women who experience miscarriages, stillbirths, infant deaths, lack of access to contraception, unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions, and lifelong obstetric, reproductive and sexual morbidity. Yet these are nearly invisible in PMNCH these days, and safe abortion – an integral part of women’s right to decide the number and spacing of their children – may be made invisible in the new Family Planning Initiative as well…

The papers [in this journal issue] show that some countries are making serious efforts at strengthening and improving their health systems in relation to reproductive health care and maternity services. Based on data that show who is dying and why, they are making policy and programme changes, such as low-cost delivery services for poor and migrant women, opening new obstetric emergency care and referral centres in hospitals, training more health professionals, and providing health education for women, as in Shanghai (Du et al)…

Others are strengthening the whole public health system, especially in rural areas where most poor women live, ensuring better leadership and governance, increasing health workforce skills, supporting community-based health insurance, and increasing contraceptive services, as in Rwanda (Bucagu et al). They’re promoting peace, stability, economic growth, poverty reduction, improved primary education, better roads and communications, access to information on health and health services, and making health care free of cost for the poor, as in Cambodia (Liljestrand & Sambath)…

In contrast, in some countries, appalling, chaotic, uneven, negligent and abusive situations persist. Among the 22 million women each year who have unsafe abortions, adolescents suffer the most from complications and have the highest unmet need for contraception (Shah & Åhman). Custom, lack of perceived need, distance, lack of transport, lack of permission from husbands, cost, unwillingness to see a male doctor are still preventing women from seeking antenatal and delivery care, e.g. in northern Nigeria (Doctor et al), but in many places, these services barely exist anyway…

In the poorest of countries, women may have more pressing health needs even than for maternity care, e.g. in Haiti, where women identified access to any affordable health care, potable water, enough food to eat, any employment, sanitation and education as their most crucial problems (Peragallo Urrutia et al)…

Even more broadly, lack of national commitment has been identified as critical in 33 sub-Saharan African countries, as well as very low levels of public financing for health and health services (let alone maternity services), poor coordination between key stakeholders and partners, poorly functioning health systems with poor logistics for supply, distribution and management of essential medicines, family planning commodities, and equipment, and a chronic shortage of skilled health professionals (Ekechi et al).

In several South Asian countries, cash is being given to pregnant women to deliver in facilities, but some studies are finding, e.g. in India, that when women arrive, there is limited or no antenatal care, no birth attendants with midwifery skills, no emergency obstetric care in obvious cases of need, and referrals that never result in treatment (Subha Sri et al). And now, these same women have a sense of entitlement, and they are protesting.

Several governments in Latin America may be embarrassed to learn that their levels of budget transparency in spending on specific aspects of maternity care were found to be very low, and that they need better budgeting modalities, better health information systems and guidelines on how they might better capture data on expenditure, in order to track and plan local and national progress (Malajovich et al). Similarly, an assessment of cash transfer and voucher schemes designed to stimulate demand for services and reduce cost barriers to maternity care found increased use of maternity services in several south Asian countries, but also a need for more efficient operational management, financial transparency, plans for sustainability, evidence of equity and, above all, proven impact on quality of care and maternal mortality and morbidity (Jehan et al).

The papers [in this journal issue] describe a range of models for advocacy and taking action to expose violations of human rights, poor public health practices, absence of monitoring and regulation, failure to ensure national accountability for sexual and reproductive rights and to provide remedies and redress in the event of violations (Kismödi et al).

full editorial

Botched motherhood

11/07/2012 Comments Off on Botched motherhood

A poem by Tiro Sebina – featured in Reproductive Health Matters May 2012
You may not want to hear
About a woman who died
In labour in a hut

You may not want to hear
About an expectant woman
Who perished aboard
A donkey cart
On a bumpy road to an apology
Of a health post
With neither doctors on site
Nor drugs in sight

You may not want to hear
About an expectant woman’s fatal fall
Off a rickety bike
Pedalled by a drunken man
Terrified of Emang Basadi
Concerned about his name
Appearing on the birth certificate

You may not want to hear
About a woman who expired
Without knowing
She was targeted by grand visions
And millennium schemes

You may not want to know
About a woman too hapless
To grace dinner-conferences
Held in her name
At exclusive venues

Who wants to know
About the bungled chaos
Of a dead mother

Trends in maternal mortality 1990-2010: latest data

18/06/2012 Comments Off on Trends in maternal mortality 1990-2010: latest data

by Marge Berer

Editor Reproductive Health Matters

Thanks to the Millennium Development Goals and much work on the part of the UN, WHO, many governments and NGOs globally and nationally, the press and media are now highly attuned to what is happening as regards maternal mortality. An announcement by WHO on behalf of the United Nations of the latest global estimates, published in May 2012, showed that the trend in maternal deaths appears to be falling overall, and resulted in many newspaper articles sharing this very good news. The global data were as follows:

  • The number of women dying due to complications of pregnancy, childbirth and unsafe abortion decreased from 543,000 in 1990 to 358,000 in 2008, and 287,000 in 2010.

This excellent news masks the fact that there has been a lot of change in some countries and virtually none in others. Here are some of the details of those differences, taken from the report:

  • Deaths are falling quickly in East Asia but the reduction is attributed largely to China.
  • Southern African countries have seen the beginnings of a reversal, but sub-Saharan Africa (56%) and southern Asia (29%) accounted for 85% of the global burden in 2010.
  • India (19%) and Nigeria (14%) alone accounted for a third of deaths globally.
  • 40 countries (20 % of the total number of countries) still have maternal mortality ratios greater than 300 deaths per 100,000 live births.
  • Countries with the highest maternal mortality ratios were: Chad, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Central African Republic, Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Sudan, Cameroon, and Nigeria; Lao PDR, Afghanistan, Haiti, Timor-Leste – these are among the world’s poorest countries, many of which are also sites of conflict, war and other crisis situations, such as earthquakes and flooding.

In other words, many countries still have very high maternal mortality ratios, including two very large countries, which account for a large proportion of deaths. Moreover, there is a growing gap between countries where improvements have taken place and many of the poorest countries, where most women are still simply not benefiting. Furthermore, as the May 2012 edition of RHM shows, there are differences within countries and between women (according to socioeconomic status, rural vs urban status, age and marital status) that are sometimes great and must not be ignored. The paper by Shah and Ahman, for example, shows that unsafe abortion deaths remain high in many countries and that young women are at the greatest risk of death and complications from unsafe abortion. A study in Nigeria shows that women in northern Nigeria are at far greater risk of maternal death than women in the south of the country. Given that the primary aim of the Millennium Development Goals is to reduce poverty and the consequences of poverty, celebration is perhaps not yet in order. However, countries where improvements have clearly taken place, such as Rwanda and Cambodia, as shown in other RHM papers, certainly deserve credit for enormous efforts.

Limitations of global estimates of maternal mortality – Nepal

15/06/2012 Comments Off on Limitations of global estimates of maternal mortality – Nepal

The latest United Nations publication on global estimates of maternal mortality was released in May this year. Some of the news from this report is good, that despite big regional variations, overall maternal mortality is reducing at a global level.

One limitation of the estimates is that they fail to shine a light on the stark disparities between countries, some of which have made little if any progress, or within countries, for example between women living in rural and urban areas. They mask inequity in access for poorer women which characterises health service provision in many countries, and which remains a huge stumbling block to tackling the preventable causes of maternal death.

There is also concern that different estimates from a range of sources confuse the picture for those in the field; that the estimates cannot provide a comprehensive understanding of what works or how to explain reductions in maternal deaths – information which is essential if further progress is to be made;  and, most worryingly, that the perception of success in reducing maternal deaths may lead to complacency or neglect of the problem.

Nepal

In Nepal, maternal mortality has reduced from 770 to 170 deaths per 100,000 live births between 1990 and 2010, thus reaching the 75% reduction MDG target for 2015. The new estimates are only one of a series of different estimates released and published. The others were published in the Lancet and by WHO here, here and here.

These papers report different estimates of maternal mortality (calculated using different methods) relevant to approximately the same period of time. On the surface, the estimated reductions in Nepal should be reason for optimism, especially as all the estimates suggest a falling trend of maternal deaths in Nepal. But these new estimates have caused confusion and frustration in Nepal.

The confusion arises because the estimates do not agree, so it is not possible to say what the current level of maternal mortality is. Some people believe that the estimates report improbably low levels of maternal mortality and a larger than expected reduction over the last two decades, given the difficult geographical terrain, relatively low access to maternity services and variable standards of care in Nepal. Their frustration arises from the difficulty in interpreting these estimates to ensure that maternal and reproductive health services do not become neglected.

Maternal mortality is notoriously difficult to measure . For now, Nepal will have to deal with the uncertainty of the estimates, at least until the national demographic and health survey planned for 2016 provides more data for better estimates. Instead of debating what the actual level of mortality is or which estimate to use, what needs to be done is to draw on the situation to generate interest in finding out why the reduction is occurring. First steps have been made to do this , but more evidence needs to be gathered to build up a convincing picture of what changes are being experienced in Nepal. The reasons we find may not necessarily be what we might assume or expect, and will provide valuable lessons for other countries still striving to reduce maternal deaths.

A guest blog by Julia Hussein

Senior Clinical Research Fellow Immpact,
Scientific Director Ipact, University of Aberdeen, UK

Reproductive Health Matters

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Maternal health: hospital delivery does not guarantee good care

25/05/2012 Comments Off on Maternal health: hospital delivery does not guarantee good care

Hospital delivery does not guarantee good care: recent cases of women who died in a referral hospital in a sub-Saharan African country

Published on the British Medical Journal Guest Blog, 17 May 2012

A key focus of work in the field of safe motherhood has been on increasing deliveries in medical facilities with access to skilled birth assistants and emergency obstetric care. In many places more and more women are reaching clinics to deliver. However, there has been too little focus on the quality of services, on the capacity of health centres to provide care to all who need it, and training of staff to provide timely, skilled and compassionate care. Stories of women dying preventable deaths and enduring serious injury in health facilities demonstrate that accessing a hospital is not enough if the health professionals women depend on for their care are callous, negligent or corrupt.

We hope by sharing these true stories of women who were injured and died we are honouring the desire of the doctor who sent them to us to share them and to shine a light on what is happening in his region.

Case 1
A woman, aged 29,  is languishing in  hospital after losing both her baby and her uterus and rupturing her bladder while trying to give birth. She was rushed to hospital three months ago after she failed to deliver her six-pound baby. According to her best friend, on arrival at this referral hospital, she was not attended to as the medics on duty said the theatre was closed for the day and there was not much they could do. With the baby halfway out, she had to bear the pain till midday the following day when the by-then dead baby was removed. By that time her uterus had ruptured and also had to be removed, while her bladder muscles were so damaged that she can no longer control the flow of urine or stools. Although she was sent home after the ordeal, she had to return three weeks ago after her condition worsened. She needs urgent surgery, and a nurse on duty said she was on the list for a surgery camp currently in northern Uganda, which is expected this week. Meanwhile, she is experiencing a lot of pain in her abdomen, private parts and legs. She does not understand why she can’t be operated on in the hospital. According to her friend, doctors said that she would need to pay (equivalent to USD 1,223) for the operation. Often, such cases are transferred to other areas.

Case 2
The contractions had started at dawn. C, a school teacher, knew it was time, so she did what was expected – checked into a hospital at 6am so she could give birth with expert attention at her disposal. But that was not to be. For more than 10 hours after she checked in, she was ignored, neglected and writhing in pain in the Labour Ward until 8pm when she breathed her last. Her crime? She did not have the money (equivalent to USD 122) the medical staff demanded before they would attend to her. So she wasted away as her husband ran desperately around the village to raise the money. It was only the hospital cleaners who tried to help remove the baby from her womb. A neighbour, who had help transport her to the hospital, said she and C’s husband could not raise the money as they had spent the little money they had to purchase surgical equipment. “When I came back, I found her in pain, crying, there was no help. The medical workers looked on as they asked for money,” the neighbour added. After three hours of waiting and sensing that C was deteriorating, the neighbour approached a midwife and asked her to attend to her but the midwife and a doctor allegedly also declined. “At about 6pm, C started gasping; she fell on the floor and was bleeding. “That was when the doctor responded and took her into the theatre, but it was too late; her life could not be saved and she died.” The doctor emerged from the theatre after about 10 minutes and announced that both C and the baby had died. C had been going with her husband for antenatal check-ups at the hospital and the midwives had told them the baby was big, and that it would be difficult for her to have a normal birth, and they had apparently recommended a caesarean section. Causes of death were obstructed labour, uterine rupture and haemorrhage. A complaint was filed with the police and the doctor was being investigated for neglect. The police surgeon who carried out the autopsy said this was not the first case at this hospital; many women had died in labour due to neglect. The district Police Commander said he had summoned the medical staff on duty that night and day to furnish evidence. However, the hospital director said at the time of C’s death, there was another woman in the operating theatre and that it had been inadvisable to halt that operation. “And in any case,” he said, “it is not the patient who asks for theatre but we examine the patient and recommend. Doctors on duty examined her and by the time they recommended her for theatre she had already ruptured her uterus… She was bleeding and we could not save her life. I can’t rule out the issue of [staff] asking for money. Some staff do it but we need to investigate this further because it has no proof.” He said the people who operated on her to remove the baby were not hospital workers but imposters who had sneaked into the hospital.

Case 3
A woman 39 year old woman died after giving birth and failing to expel the placenta for several hours. She called for the help of the nurses on duty, according to eye witnesses, but got no attention. In an interview with the local newspaper, the doctor on duty said that after the call, he had rushed to the hospital to save the situation but it was already late to save her life. He denied the claim that the woman died out of negligence because an unqualified hospital staff member had helped her instead. The District Chairman said serious action must be taken against the implicated health workers to serve as a warning, as negligence in hospitals is forcing women to visit traditional birth attendants.

Case 4
Another tragedy has occurred in A. An expectant mother of five, aged 37, died in the regional referral hospital having just been admitted at 9 pm and died due to unprofessional conduct by the health workers. Not even the simplest effort was made to help the poor women. The doctor was raised on the phone to come and attend to her, but she kept saying that she was too tired to come that night and that she would attend her the next day. The next morning, however, no one attended to her till she met her death. When she asked for help, the midwives were shouting at her, and the poor women fell off the bed due to severe labour pain. The nurses panicked and pretended to work on her to save her life but she died together with her baby still in the womb. As one enters the maternity ward at this hospital, there is a smell of death and fear among the expectant mothers. Her death has left many of them wondering if they will survive delivering in the hospital.

*****************

Though these stories are sent from sub-Saharan Africa, they are a perfect echo of the case studies from India(1) in RHM’s May Issue on Maternal Mortality in which discrimination and neglect led to preventable deaths . In India human rights law has been used for the first time to bring compensation to the family of a woman who died a preventable death and to enshrine the principle that a woman has the right to lifesaving treatment during and after childbirth (2) . In Uganda, human rights organisations and families of women who died in childbirth are filing a landmark lawsuit to hold the government accountable for maternal deaths (3); while in Latin America landmark decisions by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) have called for appropriate maternal health care, in Brazil, and decriminalisation of abortion to safeguard women’s health in Peru (4).

To read more about how people are using the law and human rights conventions to commit governments to improving maternal health care see May’s issue of Reproductive Health Matters Maternal Mortality or Women’s Health: time for action
(1)Subha Sri B, et al. An investigation of maternal deaths following public protests in a tribal district of Madhya Pradesh, central India. Reproductive Health Matters 2012; 20(39). In press.

(2)Kaur J. The role of litigation in ensuring women’s reproductive rights: an analysis of the Shanti Devi judgement in India. Reproductive Health Matters 2012; 20(39). In press.

(3)Ugandan Government to be held accountable for maternal deaths

(4) Kismödi E, et al. Human rights accountability for maternal death and failure to provide safe, legal abortion: the significance of two ground-breaking CEDAW decisions. Reproductive Health Matters 2012; 20(39). In press.

A guest blog by Lisa Hallgarten: Social Media Manager at Reproductive Health Matters; sexual health trainer, educator, and blogger at Education For Choice; and advocate for better sex education for all young people.

Reproductive Health Matters 

Follow us on Twitter 

Like us on Facebook

‘The death of a woman due to pregnancy complications is not only a biological fact; it is also a political choice.’1

16/03/2012 Comments Off on ‘The death of a woman due to pregnancy complications is not only a biological fact; it is also a political choice.’1

In 2008 UK spending on Mother’s Day gifts may have amounted to as much as UK£1.6bn,  while last year it was estimated that consumers in the United States would spend as much as US$16bn.

This contrasts sharply with spending on basic life-saving care for mothers in much of the global south – with some countries spending less on all health services per head of population per year than some people will spend on their Mother’s Day bouquet.

With just 3 years left to meet Millennium Development Goal 5a (reducing the maternal mortality ratio by 75% between 1990 and 2015), there is still a long way to go. As many as 90% of women in some countries still give birth with no skilled birth attendant and have no access to emergency obstetric care if complications arise.

Reproductive Health Matters is dedicating its May issue to the subject of maternal mortality and asks whether the rhetoric of ‘safe motherhood’ is finally being matched by resources and action. Articles cover, for example:

An analysis of unsafe abortion differentials by age in developing countries which finds that younger women, especially adolescents, are disproportionately at risk of accessing unsafe abortion.

An investigation into maternal deaths in Madhya Pradesh, which finds drastic shortfalls in both antenatal and maternity care and questions the impact of government schemes to incentivise access to health facilities during birth.

An analysis of Demographic & Health Survey data for Egypt and Bangladesh which finds that improvements in antenatal care to be found in many countries are not matched by improvements in post-partum and post-natal care – still grossly neglected areas.

An article on the role of delaying care on maternal mortality and morbidity, which explores the importance of understanding women’s ‘road to death’ by combining the three delays framework and the ‘near miss’ approach. The challenges we face in trying to meet the Millennium Development Goal for maternal mortality are enormous, but as the authors of this paper note, the biggest obstacle to change is neglect and discrimination:

‘Understanding maternal deaths as a consequence of neglect implies the recognition that it is due to the disadvantaged position of women in society, including with regard to their reproductive rights. Only women experience the inherent risks of reproduction; this is a matter of sexual difference. However the lack of appropriate reproductive health care is a matter of gender discrimination and a consequence of a social system “based on the power of sex and class”. Gender discrimination occurs in all stages of women’s lives: preference for boy children, neglect of care for girls, poor access to health, and maternal mortality. The death of a woman due to pregnancy complications is not only a biological fact; it is also a political choice that is amenable to change and within human grasp. It depends above all upon political will.’1

The journal will be published in print and online in May 2012

Subscribe to Reproductive Health Matters 

Follow RHM on Twitter

Like RHM on Facebook 

1. Pacagnella RC, et al. The role of delays in severe maternal morbidity and mortality: expanding the conceptual framework. RHM 2012; 20(39). In press.

guest blog by Lisa Hallgarten

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with maternal mortality at The Berer Blog.